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I have been or will be adopted into another country

The child has the right to grow up in a family. If the children can’t live with their parents, they have the right to live in a new adoptive or foster family.

Sometimes it may happen that parents can’t take care of their children for some reason, and the children can’t grow up in their family. Such children might grow up in children’s homes, children’s centres, or with foster parents while authorities try to find new parents for them.

If new parents can’t be found in the Czech Republic, then Umpod employees might hear about such children, and our job is to look for parents even outside the Czech Republic. This whole search is very complicated and may take some time. When the search finally ends and a new family is found for the child, then the child is adopted. Of course, each individual case is different, and not all children can find new parents abroad.

  • Do you live in a children’s home? Do some people from abroad want to adopt you?
  • Were you born in the Czech Republic and then adopted into another country?
  • Were you born to different parents than those who raised you?
  • Are you searching for your biological family? 

Do you have any of these questions?

Then we might help. Every case is different, so we’d like to know more about you and your family.

Contact us and we will write back and tell you what we can do for you.

 

I will be adopted into another country

About 30 children are in a situation similar to yours every year.

Honzík’s story (age 6)

Since his birth, Honzík has grown up in a children’s centre in the Czech Republic. Since he was little, he has been brought up by caregivers (housemothers) from the centre, and he had good friends at the centre. From time to time, new adults would come to visit one of his friends. They would start to visit more and more often, and after a while, they would take the friend home with them.

The aunties would tell him that his friend had been adopted by new parents. Honzík would be sad that he had lost his friend, and he didn’t understand why new parents were coming only for his friends, but never for him. He also wanted to go home with someone, and he often told all his aunties that they should be looking for someone to adopt him.

Honzík’s social worker tried for a long time to find new parents for him in the Czech Republic, but unsuccessfully. Then Umpod learned about Honzík. We often look for adoptive parents in other countries than the Czech Republic – for example Sweden, Iceland, Germany, Austria, Spain, and Italy.

Umpod found new parents for Honzík, and soon they came to visit him at the children’s centre. Honzík was excited, because his new visitors had a child which was a bit older than Honzík, who treated him like a little brother. After a while, he got used to this new family, and then he began to live with them. When everyone got used to each other and said they wanted to be together, the court decided that Honzík could stay in his new home with his new family.

Umpod is now watching how he is doing, and the family regularly sends information about Honzík. They will do this until he reaches the age of 18.

What is the usual procedure in such cases?

As soon as Umpod finds new parents from abroad, we start arranging for them to visit you at your current home. To help you get ready for the visit, Umpod will send you their photos and a story book written in their mother tongue which they have chosen for you. A housemother or housefather (auntie or uncle) from the children’s home will show you the photo and the story book. You can also talk to your houseparents about everything so you won’t be alone.

You will meet your visitors for the first time in a playroom where you will not be alone. There’ll be the housemother or housefather, who you know already, and if you don’t like anything, you can tell them anytime. Your visitors probably won’t speak Czech, so there will be an interpreter – a person who can speak both languages and can help you if you don’t understand each other. Because we need to know how you enjoyed the visit, an Umpod worker will also be at this meeting. During the meeting, you can show your toys to your visitors and play together. If you like it and you want them to visit you again, all you have to do is tell your houseparents and they’ll arrange that.

If the next visits go well, you can spend more time together, going for walks, etc. After a while, it may be that you won’t have to go back to the children’s home. You will be able to spend all your time with your new family. But because we also have to know that everything is all right, there will be some meetings where we will be present. If everything is alright, we will report to the deciding court that you can leave the Czech Republic for your new home with the new family.

Every case is different. If you want to know more, contact us and we will write you what we can do for you.

Who can I talk to about this?

You can talk about this with people you trust, for example your housemothers or housefathers, your foster parents, your friends, social workers, teachers, or Umpod.

How will I talk to the people who come to see me?

It might be difficult at first. It’s a good idea to learn a few words in their language beforehand. They will also learn a few words in Czech. Also, you can communicate through pictures. An interpreter is present at important meetings. This is a person who speaks both languages and will help you understand each other.

Will these people be my parents?

Honestly, we don’t know yet. If you get on well with each other, it’s possible.

What if I don’t like them?

The beginnings are usually very difficult and demanding. If you are worried about something for a long time, you can turn to the people you trust (houseparents, foster parents, social workers, teachers, or Umpod). Together we will try to figure out what to do next.

Will I stay with them for good?

If both you and they want to be together, and if no one else has any objections, it will be possible. It is up to the court to decide whether you will stay together for good.

When I leave for my new home, will I still be able to see my friends and housemothers from the children’s home or my foster parents?

At the beginning, you can call them on Skype or by mobile. Later, you may even be able to see them in person; it depends on what you decide with your new parents.

I have been adopted abroad and I want to reconnect to my biological roots – my parents, siblings or grandparents)

I was born in the Czech Republic. Because my mum and dad couldn’t care for me, I grew up in a children’s centre. Since I wanted a new family and they couldn’t find one in the Czech Republic, Umpod started looking for new parents in other countries and found the best ones for me in Spain.

My new mum and dad came to see me, and because I liked them a lot, we all went together to Spain. We’ve been living there for a long time and it’s great. My mum and dad made me a book with pictures of the centre where I had lived before, and the aunties who had taken care of me before. I love flipping through this book but sometimes I feel sad. I know I have siblings in the Czech Republic, my mum and dad told me. But I don’t know how they are and what they do.

Every case is different. If you want to know more, contact us and we will write you how we can help you. 

Who can I talk to about this?

You can talk about this with people you trust, for example your parents, your friends, social workers, or Umpod.

Do I have the right to know where I come from?

You have the right to know what happened and why you are not growing up in the country where you were born. We might have some information about that, and if we don’t, then we can try to find out. Unfortunately, there might be information which we don’t know or won’t be able to find out.

Can you tell me how my brothers and sisters are doing and where they are? Can I meet them?

Sometimes, we know how your brothers and sisters are doing and what they do. We can tell you all this. If we don’t know, we can try to find out. Unfortunately, we can’t tell you some information, such as where your brothers and sisters live. We can’t give you their photos, either. But we can let them know you’re interested. Then you might even meet them, if both you and they want to.

Can I find out something about my biological parents? Can I meet them?

We might have some information about your biological parents, and if we don’t, we can try to find out. For example, we might be able to tell you why they couldn’t take care of you, what they’re doing now, and how they are doing. But without their consent, we can’t tell you where they live or send you their photos.

What about my other biological family members? Do I have a grandma, grandpa, uncle, aunt, or cousins in the Czech Republic? Can I find out anything about them?

We might have some information about them, and if we don’t, we can try to find out. But without their consent we can’t tell you where they live or send you their photos.

What can you tell me about my family?

We can tell you everything we know or find out – except for some very personal information which we need other people’s consent to give you. 

My sibling has been adopted abroad

It is possible that your brother or sister has been adopted into a foreign country and now has parents other than you. We can’t force your sibling to be in touch with you, but we can tell them that you are interested in them. We can tell you how your brother or sister is doing. But without their consent we can’t tell you where they live.

Every case is different. If you want to know more, contact us and we will write back and tell you how we can help you.

 

The story of Maruška (age 14) and Anička (age 10)

Maruška and Anička were born to the same mum and dad, but their parents couldn’t take care of them. Maruška found foster parents in the Czech Republic but younger Anička stayed in the children’s centre. Because it was impossible to find new parents for Anička in the Czech Republic, Umpod found new parents for her abroad. Anička was adopted and moved to Spain.[…]

Now Maruška is 14 years old and Anička is 10. Maruška would like to know where her sister is and how she is doing. Maruška’s foster parents turned to their social worker to find out more. Umpod learned about it and wrote to Anička’s parents, who sent Maruška a picture of Anička and a short letter. In the future, Maruška and Anička plan to call or even meet.

Who can I talk to about this?

You can talk about it with people you trust, for example your parents, teachers, friends, social workers, or Umpod.

Do I have the right to know where my sibling lives?

You have the right to know what happened and why you haven’t been growing up with your sibling. But there is information we can’t tell you or show you without the consent of the adoptive parents - for example, your brother or sister’s new name, address, or photo.

Can I meet my brother or sister?

It is possible, if everyone involved – your brother or sister, their adoptive parents, and your legal representatives – agree.

What if my brother or sister doesn’t want to talk to me?

That is their right, and we can’t influence that. If they decide it’s okay, we can at least tell you how they are doing and what they are like.

I have been adopted from abroad to the Czech Republic

You might know you weren’t born in the Czech Republic but in a foreign country. Perhaps your original parents couldn’t take care of you, so your adoptive parents came and took you with them to the Czech Republic, where you have lived since then. Maybe you would like to know your history and where you come from.

Every case is different, so we’d like to know more about you and your family. Contact us and we will write you back and tell you how we can help you.

Besjana’s story (age 8)

Besjana was born in Albania, a country far from the Czech Republic. Her parents couldn’t take care of her, and therefore Besjana grew up in a children’s home for the first three years. It was impossible to find new parents for Besjana in Albania. But it was possible to find new parents from the Czech Republic. They came to Albania to meet her.[…]

Once it was clear that they wanted to be together, the Albanian court decided that Besjana could go with her new parents. As the name Besjana is hard for Czechs to use, her adoptive parents chose a new name for her – Barbora. Barbora’s parents have told her where she came from and where she grew up. But Barbora would like to know more about her original family.

Who can I talk to about this?

You can talk about it with people you trust, for example your parents, teachers, friends, social workers, or Umpod.

Do I have the right to know where I come from?

You have the right to know what happened and why you haven’t been growing in the country where you were born. We might have some information about that, and if not, we can try to find out. But there might be some information which we don’t know or won’t be able to find out.

What can you tell me about my family?

We can tell you everything we know or find out – except for some very personal information which we need other people’s consent to give you. 

Why couldn’t I stay in the country where I was born?

The authorities in the country where you were born tried to find you a new family there first. But this was impossible, and that’s why the search continued in other countries. New parents were found for you in the Czech Republic, so that’s why you came here.